Start
Up

Bristol Bay Native Corporation
FY2017 Annual Report

…from the very early days of ANCSA, our company has been a little different than other Alaska Native corporations. Because our early leadership and our board consisted of commercial fishermen, we had a lens into how to successfully operate a start-up business—with vision, courage, resilience, generosity, and clarity.

-Bristol Bay Native Corporation FY2017 Annual Report

In our Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2017, we explore the themes central to BBNC’s 45-year history as an Alaska Native Corporation: Courage, Vision, Resilience, Clarity, and Generosity. Here, through images, story, and the words of the people who live in Bristol Bay, we’ll take a deeper look at each of them.

Cu
ltu
re

The things the people of Bristol Bay hold dear—our deepest values, our cherished stories, our most lasting traditions—have become the lens through which we look and evaluate everything.

Listen to Timothy Wonhola, Sr. of New Stuyahok

“We should encourage our youth to rise up and embrace our culture with zeal and with joy.”
Teresa Capo

BBNC Shareholder & Cultural Presenter at Katmai Lodges

895 Bristol Bay place names Collected to date

To-date, 895 Bristol Bay place names have been collected for the Native Place Names project, helping to deepen our understanding of our shared culture, history, and heritage.

$50,000+ AWARDED IN CULTURAL HERITAGE GRANTS.

In FY2017, the BBNC Education Foundation awarded over $50,000 in cultural heritage grants across the Bristol Bay region.

RES
ILI
ENCE

We believe that a strong, resilient region is key to our success, and one worth investing in. We take pride in that. When we invest in Bristol Bay, we are investing in the future of our communities, our culture, our land, and our people.

“Resilience is embedded in our culture.”
Dorothy Larson

Vice Chair, BBNC Board of Directors

Increase in revenue for WasiLla-based Three Star Enterprises

Wasilla-based village corporation Three Star Enterprises saw an increase in revenue after completing the Small Business Administration’s 8(a) program. Three Star was one of the first village corporations in our region to receive mentorship from BBNC’s In-Region Government Contracting Initiative, which was designed to help 8(a) participants succeed.

12 village corporations and tribes

BBNC is actively working with 12 village corporations and tribes that have expressed interest in government contracting.

VI
SI
ON

Economies fluctuate. Individual business sectors occasionally struggle. Through it all, diversification has been a rudder. It’s given us a broad, solid base, and created more opportunities for our shareholders through employment, education, and economic development.

“We’ve always been forward thinking—looking to the next day, year, decade, all the while doing what we set out to do by our founding members: invest wisely.”
Jason Metrokin

President & Chief Executive Officer, BBNC

2,300+Guests Welcomed

So far in 2017, more than 2,300 guests have stayed at BBNC’s properties in Bristol Bay (Mission, Kulik, Grosvenor, and Brooks Lodges).

200+Shareholders Employed

BBNC and its companies employ more than 200 shareholders across four business lines.

CO
URA
GE

Protecting and preserving our land for future generations is a responsibility we assume with conviction and courage. BBNC’s opposition to the proposed Pebble mine reflects our reverence not only for our land, but for the fish itself that has shaped and sustained our culture and communities for thousands of years. We are taking a stand for what is right.

“I hope we put in place permanent protections for our salmon habitats that are under threat. There are ways we can do it; we just have to come together as a people.”
Verner Wilson III

BBNC Shareholder, Director of Natural Resources at Bristol Bay Native Association & Alaska Humanities Forum Alaska Salmon Fellow, 2017-2018 Cohort

What We’re Taking a Stand For: Fish

BBNC observes a “Fish First” policy that assesses the impacts that all corporate decisions will have on the region’s fisheries, and prioritizes the protection of fish and fish habitat over other uses.

What We’re Taking a Stand For: Jobs

Bristol Bay salmon fishery supports 14,000 full and part time jobs locally. Nationally, the Bristol Bay salmon industry supports nearly 20,000 permanent jobs.

What We’re Taking a Stand For: Culture

Alaska Natives in Bristol Bay believe that salmon connects them with their ancestors and heritage. In our region alone, salmon constitutes over 50% of the subsistence harvest.

GEN
EROS
ITY

In villages across our region, the first catch of the season is shared—first with Elders, and then with the surrounding community: single mothers, children, and neighbors. This act of giving between generations and families is steeped in tradition, a part of our values as Alaska Native people.

"Generosity is a value you learn at an early age as an Alaska Native Person. Native people are communal. We support each other, we’re there for each other, we share what we have."
Andria Agli

VP, Shareholder & Corporate Relations, BBNC

How we give:$638,713

In FY2017, the BBNC Education Foundation awarded $638,713 in scholarships.

How we give:The Opioid Task Force

The Opioid Task Force, a shared-resource partnership between BBNC, the Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation, Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation, Bristol Bay Housing Authority, and Bristol Bay Native Association, is working to address illicit drug use in our region.

CLA
RITY

"We've gotten here by standing behind innovation, seeking new opportunity, and not being afraid to try new things."
Read the full FY2017 annual report message to BBNC shareholders from Joseph L. Chythlook, Chairman of the Board, and Jason Metrokin, President & Chief Executive Officer.

Read the full BBNC FY2017 Annual Report